Open-Ended ‘Moore Law’ Allows Viewers to Ask Anything

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Northern Kentucky attorney Margo L. Grubbs joined Moore Law host and local TV journalist Deb Haas and attorney co-host Don Moore to answer viewer questions on a variety of topics. With the topic for the episode being “Ask Us Anything,” Don and Margo fielded questions relating to drunk driving, child support and medical malpractice.

Don began the show by noting the difference in the statute of limitations for Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana:

  • Ohio — 4 years to file property damage claim, 2 years to file an injury claim
  • Kentucky — 5 years to file property damage claim, 1 year to file an injury claim
  • Indiana — 6 years to file property damage claim, 2 years to file an injury claim

“The statute of limitations is the drop-dead deadline for you to file a claim,” Don said. “You miss it and you don’t have a case anymore. It’s just as simple as that.”

Don noted that some of the limitations can vary, and Margo clarified the difference in cases in Kentucky. “The cases that fall in the category for personal injury would be an intentional tort, for instance an assault and battery,” Margo said, adding that there can be an extension for cases such as car accidents. She agreed with Don that people always want to be wary of those limitations. “We have it in our office, ‘S.O.L.: statute of limitations,’ but it could also mean something else.”

The topic for the next episode of Moore Law will be “All About Injuries.” Deb and Don will be joined by Don’s father, retired Cincinnati civil litigation lawyer Don Moore, Sr., when the next episode airs on Monday, April 30, 2012, at 9:30 a.m. on WXIX-TV, FOX19.

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If you have been injured or have lost a loved one as a result of another person's negligence, you deserve to be fully compensated for your losses. Whether you were hurt in a truck accident or auto accident, have suffered injuries as a result of a medical malpractice incident or were a victim of corporate negligence — the simple fact is that you should not be forced to pay the price for another person's careless or reckless actions.